requiem for certainty

What an index looks like…

with one comment

Indexing can be fun!  Indeed one realizes that it is a bit of an art form once one gets into it: it involves an interesting mix of constraint and choice.  All that said, I don’t think I’d want to spend my Christmas vacation writing an index — fortunately, I’m already finished with mine, and even before our the fall colors (or what we have of them here) have let go of their trees.

Below is the near-final draft of the index (sans page numbers, and separated out into separate subject and name indices) for Genealogy as Critique, my next project. It’s quite nice to have the writing process end on a very up note.

Subject Index

anthropology,

; of the contemporary,

appropriationist historiography. See historiography, appropriationist

archaeology,

; expansion into genealogy,

; as problematizational,

; proposed alternative forms of,

; and transcendentality,

articulation,

assemblage,

. See also complexity

autonomy. See freedom, as autonomy

biopolitics and biopower,

bodies and pleasures

. See pleasure

care of the self

. See self-care

complexity,

; exemplified,

; Bourdieu’s use of,

; Foucault’s genealogical use of,

; Hacking’s use of,

; Rabinow’s use of,

conditions of possibility,

; philosophical problem of ‘conditioned conditioners’,

; historicity versus transcendentality of,

contextualism,

; compatibility with universality,

; Habermasian notion of,

contingency,

; anti-inevitability thesis,

; Bourdieu’s use of,

; Foucault’s genealogical use of,

; Hacking’s use of,

; necessity and,

; Rabinow’s use of,

; ‘the that’ versus ‘the how’ (fact of contingency versus history of contingencies),

; universality and, see contingent universals

; in Williams,

contingent universals,

contradiction (as a critical operation),

counter-conduct,

critical inquiry,

; two dimensions or tasks of (problematizing and reconstructing),

critical theory (Frankfurt School),

; compatibility with genealogical critique,

critique,

; historical varieties of,

; Kant’s notion of,

; modernity as an object of, see modernity,

; Nietzsche’s notion,

; as problematization, see problematization

; transcendental versus historical,

; without judgment,

. See also conditions of possibility and critical inquiry

crypto-normativity,

cultural critical philosophy,

delegation strategy (for genealogy and critical theoretical pragmatism),

desire,

dialectics,

discipline and disciplinary power,

; in Foucault’s genealogy of modern powers and freedoms,

discursive formation,

dispositif,

emergence,

empiricism,

; Foucault’s,

episteme,

ethics,

; commitments in Foucault’s,

; Foucault’s statuary of ethical antiquity (metaphor),

; in relation to politics in Foucault, see politics,

; orientations and commitments distinguished,

; responsive ethics,

; reconstructive ethics,

; self-transformative ethics, see self-transformation

. See also morality

exclusion. See modernity, exclusion as the logic of.

experimentalism,

; Dewey’s account of,

freedom,

; as autonomy,

; as liberation, see liberation

; as a practice,

; as a process (rather than a capacity),

; as resistance,

; as self-transformation, see self-transformation

French theory,

. See also Foucault, reception of in North America.

genealogy,

; aims of,

; archaeology and,

; critical (i.e., Kantian),

; Foucaultian,

; methodological role,

; of modernity, see modernity,

; Nietzschean,

; normative valences of,

; parlor game demonstration of the current fashionability of,

; problematization and, see problematization

; reconstruction and, see reconstruction

; revising the received (and misleading) view of,

; specification of,

; temporality and spatiality in,

; three modes of (subversion, vindication, and problematization) ,

; tradition of,

; Williamsian,

genetic fallacy (and genetic argumentation),

governmentality,

historical epistemology,

historical ontology,

historicity,

historiography

; critical,

; appropriationist,

. See also genealogy as method, history, and history of the present

history,

; as act (verb) and object (noun),

. See also genealogy

history of the present,

hourglass of threads (metaphor),

human rights,

ideology critique,

inquiry

. See critical inquiry

intensification,

integration strategy (for genealogy and critical theoretical pragmatism),

knowledge,

; depth savoir,

. See also power-knowledge.

liberation,

liberalism,

; and neoliberalism,

madness,

; the mad philosopher,

; and reason,

; and unreason, see unreason

measurement, standards of. See standards of measure

metaphysics, recent attempts at a fashionable revival of an unworkable proposal for contemporary philosophy,

method and methodology,

; method (or analytic) versus concept distinction,

; potentiality for providing contemporary philosophy a forward motion and momentum,

. See also genealogy, archaeology, and problematization

modernity,

; Foucault’s accounts of,

; exclusion, as the logic of,

; as practices rather than as epoch or era,

; purification, as the logic of,

; Weberian accounts of,

morality,

; fascist (or control morality),

; freespirit (or liberation morality),

; genealogy of modern morality in Foucault,

; Nietzsche on,

; Williams on,

. See also ethics

necessity,

; and contingency,

; and universality,

 

niches,

. See also vectors

normativity,

; compatible with genealogy,

; in critical theory,

; Foucault’s genealogy not ambitious about,

; in pragmatism,

panopticon,

parrhesia,

phenomenology,

philosophy,

; cultural critical, see cultural critical philosophy

; in relation to politics in Foucault,

; way of life, as a,

pleasure,

politics,

; in relation to ethics in Foucault,

; in relation to philosophy in Foucault, see philosophy

. See also power

postmodernism,

power,

; as an analytical category,

; depth pouvoir,

; and freedom,

; no “theory” of, in Foucault,

. See also biopower, discipline, and power-knowledge

power-knowledge,

; coproduction of,

; multiplicity of vectors,

. See also biopower, discipline, and knowledge

practices

; and problematizations,

pragmatism,

; as critical (i.e., Kantian),

; as reconstructive method,

; compatible with genealogy,

present, the,

; the history of, see history of the present

problem, as analytical category

. See problematization

problematization,

; as act (verb) and object (noun),

; centrality for Foucault’s genealogy,

; clarifying and intensifying,

; fraught or dangerous,

; enabling and disabling of practices,

; expressed throughout Foucault’s work,

; mode of critique,

; mode of distinctive genealogy,

; of modernity, see modernity,

; normativity not a goal of,

; practices and,

; reconstruction and,

; specification of,

punishment,

; prison and,

purification. See modernity, purification as the logic of.

reason,

; and madness, see madness and reason

reciprocal incompatibility,

. See also modernity, purification as the logic of

reconstruction,

; in critical theory,

; genealogy’s invitation to,

; in pragmatism,

regulation

. See biopolitics and biopower

resistance,

self

; self-care,

; self-transformation,

. See also subject

sexuality,

singularity,

speculative realism,

standards of measure,

; universalizability of,

strategies,

. See also practices

subject, the,

; as a transformative practice,

subversion (mode of genealogy),

techniques,

. See also practices

temporality,

; multiplicity of temporalities,

thought, the severe work of,

transcendental critique. See critique

truth

; in Foucault,

; in Hacking,

; in Nietzsche,

; in Williams,

universality

; contingency and, see contingent universals

; necessity and, see necessity

; temporality of,

; universalizing versus universalism,

unreason,

vectors,

. See also niches

vindication (mode of genealogy),

Name Index (sans sub-entries)

Adams, John Quincy

Agamben, Giorgio

Allen, Amy

Allen, Barry

Althusser, Louis

Benhabib, Seyla

Bernauer, James

Bernstein, Richard J.

Bourdieu, Pierre

Braudel, Fernand

Brown, Wendy

Butler, Judith

Canguilhem, Georges

Collingwood, R.G.

Cusset, François

Cutrofello, Andrew

Darwin, Charles

Daston, Lorraine

Davidson, Arnold

DeLanda, Manuel

Deleuze, Gilles

Derrida, Jacques

Dewey, John

Dreyfus, Hubert

Duchamp, Marcel

Faubion, James

Flynn, Thomas

Foucault, Michel

Fraser, Nancy

Galison, Peter

Geuss, Raymond

Gros, Frédéric

Habermas, Jürgen

Hacking, Ian

Han-Pile, Beatrice

Heidegger, Martin

Heyes, Cressida

Honneth, Axel

Hoy, David

Huffer, Lynne

Hume, David

James, William

Kant, Immanuel

Laclau, Ernesto

MacIntyre, Alasdair

Mahmood, Saba

McCarthy, Thomas

McWhorter, Ladelle

Nehemas, Alexander

Nietzsche, Friedrich

O’Neill, Onora

Oksala, Johanna

Peirce, Charles Santiago

Poovey, Mary

Rabinow, Paul

Rajchman, John

Rorty, Richard

Rose, Nikolas

Sartre, Jean-Paul

Sawicki, Jana

Strawson, P.F.

Thompson, Kevin

Tsing, Anna

Veyne, Paul

Weber, Max

West, Cornel

Williams, Bernard

Žižek, Slavoj

 

All done?!  Well, if you’ve read all that, then in a way you’ve read the book.  Although it’s not as if an index is so exactly a symbol as to obviate the rest…..

 

 

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Written by Colin Koopman

October 15, 2012 at 1:46 am

One Response

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  1. congrats on the new book, looks like one to add to the reading list.
    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=1608

    dmf

    October 23, 2012 at 7:31 pm


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